Cabbage and Potato Gratin with Sage

Just too much cabbage in her CSA box was a challenge for a woman on the Washington Post Food Chat. How much coleslaw can one eat, she asked, and what else can be done with it? This is one of my favorite dishes, despite the need for baking. It’s pretty good at room temperature as well as Ray Ban outlet warm, and it’s a great dish to make throughout the year, but it’s especially good in summer when the potatoes are new and the cabbage is really fresh.

Cabbage and Potato Gratin with Sage (Serves 4)
1 pound new summer potatoes, sliced ¼-inch thick
1 1/2 pounds green cabbage, cut into 1-inch ribbons
sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup butter (1/2 stick)
3 tablespoons chopped dill (try sage in fall)
1 garlic clove, chopped
1 1/3 cups milk
3 eggs
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup flour

1. Preheat the oven to 350’F. Lightly butter an 8 x 12-inch gratin dish. Bring a gallon of water to a boil while you prepare the potatoes and cabbage.

2. Add 1-tablespoon salt to the water and the potatoes. Boil until nearly tender, about six minutes. Scoop them into a colander, then add the cabbage to the pot and http://www.gafasraybanoutletes.com/ cook for five minutes. The water may not return to a boil. Drain, rinse, then twist in a kitchen towel to remove the excess moisture. Combine the cabbage and potatoes in a bowl with the dill.

3. Melt the butter in a small skillet with the garlic. Cook for about 1 minute without letting the garlic brown. Pour it over the cabbage and potatoes. Toss well, taste for salt, and season with pepper. Transfer to the baking dish.

4. Whisk the remaining ingredients together, pour them over the vegetables, and bake until firm and lightly browned, about 50 minutes. Let cool at least ten minutes, then cut into pieces and serve. Nice with a light, fresh tomato sauce or diced summer tomatoes.

15 comments to Cabbage and Potato Gratin with Sage

  • I am so pleased to have your blog now available to us. I know
    I will be watching for each new addition. Cheers, Chase

  • Donna Ellis

    This is what’s for dinner tonight. I’m not a cabbage fan, but my husband plants some every year, and I have a small head of it lingering in my fridge. This looks delicious, and I might even enjoy the cabbage surrounded by the potatoes, herbs and cheese!

  • Donna – Do try, and I hope you enjoy it! Sometimes a home-grown cabbage is more mild and sweet than a storage cabbage from the store.

  • Donna

    This turned out really well, and I did not scrape the cabbage aside on my plate! All the flavors seemed to be on equal terms, and it was good leftover. The little head of cabbage was very tightly packed inside (I don’t why, but that seems like a good thing). I think this would make a good alternative to the quiche type dishes I often end up taking to family gatherings. Thanks Deborah!

  • Donna – Glad you like it! Yes, you can use this
    method for other vegetables, too.

  • I made this for supper one evening early in the week, and we had it again the next night. I added some chopped onion to the garlic, sprinkled a little more parmesan on top of the dish before baking, used sage from my garden, and it was possibly the best thing we’ve eaten in quite some time, earthy and peasanty and with a big green salad, a very satifying end to the day. I’ve just bought your Vegetable Soups cookbook, and think I can see a delicious winter ahead of us.

  • Mary Ellen —I love to see people play with my recipes – a little sage, some onion — what good ideas. And I’m thrilled that Vegetable Soups brings winter into a delicious focus. Thank you!

  • I really enjoyed this recipe as I do all of your recipes. I served with a tomato sauce as you suggested above. I will definitely be making this again. Thanks Deborah!

  • I can’t wait to try this!

  • Another great recipe for cabbage is “Cabbage and Leek Gratin” found in Deborah’s Vegetarian Suppers cookbook. It is served with a mustard cream which is divine with the leeks. As a great bonus, it is fast and easy to prepare, but you have to leave yourself some time for cooking in the oven. I highly recommend it.

    • Thanks, Lois. I like that recipe too. A lot. And you can always use that baking time to do something else,
      like walk the dog, have a glass of wine, help kids with homework, have a conversation, spend a few minutes
      in the garden planting potatoes, which is exactly what I’m going to do!

  • I just shared this recipe with my CSA members who received their first cabbages of the summer this week! I’m going to try the recipe on guests this evening 🙂

  • Jessica Raia-Long

    I’m a chef for a spiritual retreat center in Tampa. I often have vegan and vegetarian requests from many groups. Your Greens Cookbook is my “go-to” book very often. I’m trying this at home tonight and hope to present it to a group at the end of September. How warm and satisfying this sounds with a simple salad! Thank you.

    • Jessica – thank you so much for your e-mail! I hope that works well for you. It feels like our first fall day here so I might make it as well. By the way, my Vegetarian Suppers book as a lot of vegan recipes, or clues on how to make the recipes vegan. And Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone has plenty to work from, in case you aren’t familiar with it. Many a bit simpler than Greens. Best of luck with your retreat, brave girl!

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